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  • Camembert
  • Camembert

    French - Buttery - Creamy - Milky - Sweet

  • Burrata
  • Burrata

    Italian/USA - Buttery - Milky

  • Roquefort
  • Roquefort

    French - Salty - Sharp - Tangy

  • Brie
  • Brie

    French - Fruity - Mild - Nutty - Tangy

    Camembert

    Marie Harel created the original Camembert cheese from raw milk in Normandy, France in 1791. Today, however, a very small percentage of producers make cheese from raw milk with the same process as Marie Harel would have used. Those who produce cheese using Marie Harel’s method, can legally call their cheese Camembert Normandie under the AOC guidelines. However, the production of Camembert cheese has now transcended the AOC designation. Very good varieties of Camembert cheese made from pasteurised milk can be found in Normandy today. The best of them is the Camembert Le Châtelain.

    The fresh Camembert cheese is bland, hard and crumbly in texture. Young Camembert has a milky and sweet taste. As the cheese matures it forms a smooth, runny interior and a white bloomy rind that is typical to Camenbert cheese. It has a rich, buttery flavour. The rind is bloomy white caused by a white fungus, called penicillium candidum.The rind is meant to be eaten with the cheese.

    This cheese is best paired with a light red wine such as Beaujolais, Chenin Blanc, St Emilion, St Estephe or traditionally a glass of Normandy cider.

    Made fromUnpasteurized Cow's Milk
    RegionNormandy, Camembert
    FamilyCamembert
    TypeSoft, Artisan, Soft-ripened
    TextureChalky, Runny, Smooth, Soft, Soft-ripened and Supple
    RindBloomy
    ColourPale Yellow
    FlavourButtery, Creamy, Milky, Sweet
    AromaEarthy
    VegetarianNo

    Burrata

    Burrata, meaning “buttery” in Italian is a fresh cheese made from a mix of mozzarella and cream. The outside thin shell is a pasta filata curd made of buffalo and/or cow’s milk mozzarella while the insides contain a soft, doughy, stringy, mixture of curd and fresh cream. The cheese originated in the Apulia region of Italy known for sheep farming and agriculture. It is sold traditionally in asphodel leaves with a polyethylene plastic bag over it. The green colour of asphodel leaves is an indicator of the freshness of the cheese.

    When you cut open a Burrata, it oozes with buttery and creamy panna containing scraps of mozzarella. The cream has a rich flavour and has to be eaten immediately since it is a fresh cheese. Burrata is usually served fresh at room temperature and beyond 48 hours, it is considered past its prime. The taste of Burrata goes well with salads, crusty bread, and prosciutto, fresh tomatoes with olive oil and with spaghetti.

    Made fromPasteurized or unpasteurized water buffalo's milk
    RegionApulia
    FamilyMozzarella
    TypeFresh Soft, Artisan
    TextureCreamy and Stringy
    RindLeaf Wrapped
    ColourWhite
    FlavourButtery, Milky
    AromaFresh, Milky
    VegetarianNo

    Roquefort

    Roquefort is a popular French cheese, reported to be a favourite of Emperor Charlemagne. In France, it is called the ‘cheese of kings and popes’.

    This cheese is protected by AOC guidelines.

    Roquefort cheese is moist and breaks into little pieces easily.

    Genuine Roquefort is rich, creamy and sharp, tangy, salty in flavour.

    It is aged for 5 months.

    It is also mostly used in salads and dressings

    Made fromUnpasteurized sheep's milk
    Regionregion surrounding Roquefort-sur-Soulzon
    FamilyBlue
    TypeSemi-soft, Artisan, Blue-veined
    TextureCreamy and Crumbly
    RindNatural
    ColourBlue
    VegetarianNo

    Brie

    Brie is the best known French cheese and has a nickname “The Queen of Cheeses”. Brie is a soft cheese named after the French region Brie, where it was originally created. Several hundred years ago, Brie was one of the tributes which had to be paid to the French kings.

    In France, Brie is very different from the cheese exported to the United States. “Real” French Brie is unstabilized and the flavour is complex when the surface turns slightly brown. When the cheese is still pure-white, it is not matured. If the cheese is cut before the maturing process, it will never develop properly. Exported Brie, however, is stabilized and never matures. Stabilized Brie has a much longer shelf life and is not susceptible to bacteriological infections.

    Brie is produced from the whole or semi-skimmed cow’s milk. Rennet is added in to raw milk and heated to a temperature of 37°C to obtain the curd.  The cheese is then cast into molds, several layers of cheese are filled into mould and then kept for around 18 hours. After this the cheese is salted and aged for minimum four weeks.

    Brie cheese is slightly pale in colour with a greyish tinge under a rind. Its flavour varies depending upon the ingredients added while producing the cheese.

    Brie, one of the great dessert cheeses.

    In order to enjoy the taste fully, Brie must be served at room temperature

    Made fromUnpasteurized Cow's Milk
    RegionSeine-et-Marne
    FamilyBrie
    TypeSoft, Artisan, Soft-ripened
    TextureButtery, Runny and Soft-ripened
    RindBloomy
    ColourCream
    FlavourFruity, Mild, Nutty, Tangy
  • Chevres
  • Chevres

    French

  • Taleggio
  • Taleggio

    Italy - Fruity - Mild - Tangy

  • Asiago
  • Asiago

    Italy - Full-Flavoured - Mild - Milky - Sharp

  • Blue
  • Blue

    English - Sour - Sharp - Rich - Tangy

    Chevres

    Chevre is French for Goat’s cheese i.e. cheeses made out of goat’s milk. They are popular among elderly and children who are more likely to show low tolerance to cow’s milk. Also, goat cheeses are lower in fat, and higher in vitamin A and potassium. They serve as a perfect substitute for many dieters. A majority of goat cheeses come from France, the most famous among them being Bucheron, Chabis and Crottin de Chavignol.

    Goat cheeses have a unique, tart, earthy flavour that sets them apart from cow cheeses. This distinctive tang and aroma grows robust and bold as it ages. Milk production of goats, unlike of cow’s, is seasonal from mid-March through October. Only a few cheeses are aged beyond four months and they cannot be frozen without loss of quality. Considering the availability of limited milk production, experiments are on to make cheeses from frozen goat milk curd.

    The flavour and aroma of goat cheese relies upon its moisture, density, aging and flavouring. It can feature a soft, semisoft, firm, or hard texture that indicates its moisture content. They come in many sizes and shapes, such as round patties, log-shapes, drum-shapes, pyramids, round loaves, long loaves etc. Chevres are excellent dessert cheeses, often served as snacks or before dinner drinks.

    Made fromGoat's Milk
    ColourWhite

    Taleggio

    Taleggio is a smear-ripened Italian cheese named after the caves of Val Taleggio. It’s one of the oldest soft cheeses produced in every autumn and winter. During cheese making, the acidic milk is brought to the lab, and kept on the wood shelves in the chambers as well in caves according to tradition. In order to prevent it from mould infestation, the cheese is washed with seawater once a week. The maturation takes 6 – 10 weeks forming a thin crust.

    This cheese has been granted a PDO designation and contains 48% fat. The cheese has a strong smell, but its taste is relatively mild with an unusual fruity tang. To make it brighter and moderate, factories add spices, raisins, nuts and some lemons to it. When grated on salads such as radicchio and rucola, it tastes like a wonder, as well melts well. Taleggio can be served with Italian Nebbiolo wines, and also a wide range of Reds and Whites.

    Made fromPasteurized Cow's Milk
    RegionVal Taleggio
    TypeSemi-soft, Smear-ripened
    TextureCreamy
    RindWashed
    ColourPale Yellow
    FlavourFruity, Mild, Tangy
    AromaPungent, Strong
    VegetarianNo

    Asiago

    Asiago, is a cow’s milk cheese, produced only on the Asiago plateau in the Veneto foothills in Italy. The cheese-making tradition in the provinces of Vicenza and Trento dates back to more than thousand years. Traditionally, it was made from sheep’s milk but today it is produced from unpasteurised cow’s milk.

    Texture wise, Asiago goes through many changes, assuming different textures, according to its aging. There are two types of Asiago – fresh Asiago (Asiago Pressato) has a smooth texture while the aged Asiago (Asiago d’allevo) has a crumbly texture. Asiago d’allevo is matured for different time periods; Mezzano for 4-6 months, Vecchio for more than ten months and Stravecchio for two years. On the other hand, Asiago Pressato made with whole milk is matured for a month and sold fresh as a softer, milder cheese.

    Depending on age, the rinds of Asiago can be straw coloured and elastic to brownish gray and hard. The paste can be white to dark yellow, with small to medium irregular holes. Based on the aging, Asiago can be used for grating, melting, slicing on a variety of salads, sandwiches, soups, pastas, and sauces.

    Made fromUnpasteurized Cow's Milk
    RegionVeneto, Trentino
    TypeHard
    TextureCompact, Crumbly, Open and Smooth
    RindNatural
    ColourYellow
    FlavourFull-flavored, Mild, Milky, Sharp
    AromaPungent
    VegetarianNo

    Blue

    Shropshire Blue Cheese is a soft textured, mellow cheese produced using pasteurised cow’s milk and a vegetable rennet, making it suitable for vegetarians. The cheese is matured for around 12 weeks (though this can be extended for a further 12 weeks leading to a creamier, fuller cheese) and has a 48% fat content.

    The cheese has a vividly contrasting colour, between the blue veins and the clear orange of the curd, produced by the addition of the natural food colouring, annatto.

    Despite the name, the cheese was actually originally made by Andy Williamson, a trained blue cheese maker, at the Castle Stuart dairy in Inverness, Scotland in the 1970’s. The cheese trialled the names “Inverness-shire Blue” and “Blue Stuart”, but eventually rebranded as Shropshire Blue as a means of increasing popularity and acceptability of the cheese (as Scotland was not known for it’s Blues).

    Unfortunately the Castle Stuart dairy was closed in 1980 and since then the Shropshire Blue cheese has been produced by dairies in and around Nottinghamshire, namely the Long Clawson, Leicestershire, Cropwell Bishop and Colston Bassett farms and dairies.

    Shropshire Blue cheese has a strong and sharp flavour, similar to other Blue cheeses such as Stilton and Blue Cheshire, but substantially creamier. There is a sour, yeasty bite contained within the rich, mellowing taste, accompanied by a tangy aroma.

    Made fromPasteurized Cow's Milk
    RegionInverness
    FamilyBlue
    TypeSemi-soft, Blue-veined
    TextureCreamy, Crumbly and Smooth
    RindNatural
    ColourBlue
    FlavourSpicy, Strong
    VegetarianNo
  • Stilton
  • Stilton

    English - Spicy - Strong

  • Cheddar
  • Cheddar

    English - Creamy - Sharp

  • Muenster
  • Muenster

    French - Savory - Tangy

  • Limburger
  • Limburger

    Belgium/Netherlands/Germany - Grassy - Mild - Mushroomy

    Stilton

    This is one of the best British cheeses, worthy of a sonnet. It is a quintessential English cheese, suitable not only for celebrations, but also to perk up every day dishes. It is the only British cheese to have a Certification Trade Mark and an EU Protected Name.

    The Stilton cheese can only be produced in the three counties of Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire. The cheese is made from locally produced cow’s pasteurised milk. It is made in a cylindrical shape and allowed to form its own coat or crust. The distinctive feature of this cheese is magical blue veins radiating from the centre of the cheese.

    Traditionally, this cheese has been paired with sherry and port wine. It is also a good choice to go with walnuts, crackers, biscuits and breads.

    Made fromPasteurized Cow's Milk
    RegionDerbyshire, Leicestershire, Nottinghamshire
    FamilyBlue
    TypeSemi-soft, Blue-veined
    TextureCreamy, Crumbly and Smooth
    RindNatural
    ColourBlue
    FlavourSpicy, Strong
    VegetarianNo

    Cheddar

    During olden days, England was the only place where Cheddar cheeses were made. However, many countries all over the world manufacture Cheddar today.

    Any cheese producing company or any of the artisan manufacturers in any corner of the world can label the cheese produced by them as ‘Cheddar’ since it is not protected like other cheese names or brands.

    Cheddar cheese, the most widely purchased and eaten cheese in the world is always made from cow’s milk. It is a hard and natural cheese that has a slightly crumbly texture if properly cured and if it is too young, the texture is smooth. It gets a sharper taste as it matures, over a period of time between 9 to 24 months. Shaped like a drum, 15 inches in diameter, Cheddar cheese is natural rind bound in cloth while its colour generally ranges from white to pale yellow. However, some Cheddars may have a manually added yellow-orange colour.

    Joseph Harding, the “father of Cheddar cheese” who invented modern cheese making techniques described the ideal quality of original Somerset Cheddar as “close and firm in texture, mellow in character or quality, rich with a tendency to melt in the mouth and has full and fine flavour somewhat like hazelnut!”

    Made fromPasteurized Cow's Milk
    RegionSomerset
    FamilyCheddar
    TypeHard, Artisan, Processed
    TextureCompact and Crumbly
    ColourPale Yellow
    FlavourCreamy, Sharp
    VegetarianNo

    Muenster

    Munster, also known as Munster Géromé is a soft washed rind cheese made from milk produced by cows living in the regions between Alsace, Lorraine and Franche-Comté in France. The name Munster is derived from the little town of Munster where Vosgian abbeys and monasteries used to make this cheese since the Middle Ages.

    Traditional Munster is protected by an Appellation d’Origine Contrôlée (AOC) which requires the cheese be made from unpasteurised cow’s milk called crude milk. The soft and creamy cheese also comes flavoured with cumin and tastes best when accompanied with a good beer. As with washed rind cheeses, Munster have a red coating on the rind that is slightly humid due to repeated washings. Other than protecting the cheese, the rind is also responsible for a strong, penetrating aroma and tangy taste.

    The best Munster cheeses are produced in the summer and autumn when the cows graze on the ‘high stubble’ of the Vosges. This cheese has a very high fat content of 45-50%. Gewurztraminer or full-bodied red wines nicely complement Munster. If you’re a potato and cheese lover try Munster with potatoes, salad and finely chopped onions.

    Made fromUnpasteurized Cow's Milk
    RegionVosges, Haut-Rhin, Bas-Rhin
    TypeSsoft, Smear-ripened
    TextureCreamy, Smooth and Sticky
    RindWashed
    ColourWhite
    FlavourSavory, Tangy
    AromaStinky, Strong
    VegetarianNo

    Limburger

    Limburger is a semi-soft, washed rind cheese that originated in the historical Duchy of Limburg, now divided among three countries; Germany, Belgium and Netherlands. The cheese is popularly known for its stinky aroma which has been compared to foot odour. Today, most of the cheese is exclusively made in Germany, making them the sole producers in Europe.

    Artisanal cheese makers prepare this cheese from pasteurised cow’s milk sourced from local, organic farms. As a result, the flavour of the cheese is mild despite the stinky aroma.

    The exterior of the cheese is covered with a thin pale, orange-brown rind, an effect of regular washings.

    In the initial month of ripening, Limburger is firmer and more crumbly, but starts to become chalky and soft at the end of six weeks. After two months, the cheese is much smoother and creamy. At three months, Limburger finally acquires the infamous aroma due to smear-ripening with solutions of bacteria.

    The interior is a soft and yielding, straw-coloured pate that becomes runnier with age. This cheese has a significant grassy and mushroomy taste underlined by delicate tang at the end.

    Limburger goes well with Belgian style ales and icy cold bock beer. It tastes best when it is served between two slices of dark rye bread along with a slice of onion.

    Made fromPasteurized Cow's Milk
    TypeSemi-soft, Smear-ripened
    TextureCreamy, Crumbly, Firm and Smooth
    RindWashed
    ColourStraw
    FlavourGrassy, Mild, Mushroomy
    AromaStinky
    VegetarianNo
  • Mozzarella
  • Mozzarella

    Italian - Milky

  • Swiss (Emmental)
  • Swiss (Emmental)

    Swiss - Nutty - Sweet

  • Gouda
  • Gouda

    Dutch - Creamy - Full-Flavoured - Nutty - Sweet

  • Manchego
  • Manchego

    Spanish - Fruity - Nutty - Sweet - Tangy

    Mozzarella

    Mozzarella cheese is a sliceable curd cheese originating in Italy. Traditional Mozzarella cheese is made from milk of water buffalos herded in very few countries such as Italy and Bulgaria. As a result, most of the Mozzarella cheeses available now are made from cow’s milk.

    An Italian Traditional Specialty Guaranteed (TSG) food product, Mozzarella cheese is not aged like most cheeses. It is eaten fresh and within few hours after it is made.

    Fresh Mozzarella cheese is one of those easy-to-make-at-home cheeses used while making variety of recipes, including salads, meats, seafood, and vegetables.

    Other types of Mozzarella:

    Mozzarella di Bufala, also known as ‘buffalo mozzarella’, is made from domesticated water buffalo milk.

    Mozzarella Fior di Latte is produced from fresh, pasteurised or unpasteurised cow milk, while Low-moisture mozzarella is made from whole or part skimmed milk. And last, but not least, Mozzarella affumicata is a smoked variety of Mozzarella.

    Made fromPasteurized or Unpasteurized Cow's or Water Buffalo's Milk
    RegionCampania, Abruzzo, Molise and Puglia
    FamilyItalian Cheese
    TypeSemi-soft, Brined
    TextureSpringy, Stringy and Supple
    RindRindless
    ColourWhite
    FlavourMilky
    AromaFresh, Milky
    VegetarianYes

    Swiss (Emmental)

    This cheese is produced in the central cantons of Switzerland. It is a traditional, unpasteurised, hard cheese made from cow’s milk. It’s hard, thin rind is covered by paper with producer’s name on it.

    The aroma is sweet with tones of fresh-cut hay.

    The flavour is very fruity, not without a tone of acidity.

    Emmental has walnut-sized holes.

    It is considered to be one of the most difficult cheeses to be produced because of its complicated hole-forming fermentation process.

    The cheese tastes delicious with a glass of wine, for example Jura Blanc

    Made fromCow's Milk
    TypeHard
    VegetarianNo

    Gouda

    Gouda, or “How-da” as the locals say, is a Dutch cheese named after the city of Gouda in the Netherlands. If truth be told, it is one of the most popular cheeses in the world, accounting for 50 to 60 percent of the world’s cheese consumption. It is a semi-hard cheese celebrated for its rich, unique flavour and smooth texture. The original cheese markets in Gouda is one of the last standing commercial cheese markets in the Netherlands. Since the name is not protected, it has become a generic classification for all cheeses produced and sold under the name Gouda.

    Gouda is typically made from pasteurised cow’s milk although some artisan varieties use sheep’s or goat’s milk to produce cheeses that are going to be aged for a long time. Boerenkaas is a typical variety of unpasteurised Gouda cheese produced by the farmers from milk of cow’s grazing on the natural, low pastures of Netherlands. There are seven different types of Gouda cheese, categorized depending on age. Graskaas is young Gouda ready to be consumed within weeks of production. On the other hand, is the extra aged, Overjarig cheese which has a full-flavoured, hard, golden interior and salty flavour reminiscent of a toffee. Between the spectrums is a variety of Dutch Gouda’s classified as per the texture and age – Jong, Jong belegen, Belegen, Extra belegen, and Oud. Each cheese gets increasingly firmer in texture and richer in flavour than earlier classification. The waxed rind of the cheese also changes by the age as soft, younger Dutch Gouda cheese are identified by yellow, orange, or red wax rinds white mature cheese have black wax coverings.

    In America, smoother and less flavourful commercial Gouda is popular than Dutch Gouda. Artisans in Netherlands may produce Dutch Gouda using raw milk as well as pasteurised.  To enhance the flavour of the cheese, herbs, seasonings, and nuts may be blended. In Netherlands, aged Gouda is commonly used to richen soups, sauces.

    Young Goudas are best paired with beer while medium cheeses taste best when paired with a fruity Riesling or Chenin Blanc. A well aged Gouda complements wines that are deeply flavoured such as a rich Merlot or Shiraz. Gouda cheese may be grated, sliced, cubed or melted. It may be used as a table cheese or dessert cheese.

    Made fromPasteurized or Unpasteurized Cow's, Goat's or Sheep's Milk
    RegionSouth Holland, Gouda
    Family Gouda
    TypeSemi-hard, Artisan, Brined, Processed
    TextureCompact, Crumbly, Dense and Springy
    RindWaxed
    ColourYellow
    FlavourCreamy, Full-flavored, Nutty, Sweet

    Manchego

    The Manchego is produced in the La Mancha region of Spain, which is also home to Don Quixote. It is made from unpasteurised sheep’s milk. It is one of the popular cheeses from Spain, made from sheep’s milk. It also comes under the PDO guidelines.

    The traditional use of grass moulds leaves a distinctive, characteristic zigzag pattern on the Manchego cheese. Authentic Manchego is only made from the Manchego sheep’s milk. Manchego cheese is made from both pasteurised and unpasteurised milk. The farmhouse version is produced from unpasteurised milk while the industrial version is produced from pasteurised milk.

    The rind is inedible with a distinctive, traditional herringbone basket weave pattern, pressed on it. A typical ear wheat pattern is pressed onto the top and bottom wheels of the cheese. There are specific differences in Manchego cheeses, depending on their aging period.

    Semi Curado – Young Manchego cheese is aged around 3 months are supple and moist. The flavour is fruity, grass, hay with a tangy note.

    Curado – Manchego cheese aged for 6 months acquires a caramel and nutty flavour. It has distinct acidity.

    Viejo – Manchego cheese aged for a year becomes crumbly in texture while the interior of the cheese acquires a butterscotch colour. It has a sweet, lingering taste.

    Manchego cheeses are best paired with a sherry. Cheeses similar to Manchego are called ‘Machego like cheeses’, but the producers cannot legally name the cheese as Manchego.

    This celebrated cheese has won gold and silver award at the 2014 World Cheese Awards.

    Made fromUnpasteurized Sheep's Milk
    RegionLa Mancha
    TypeSemi-soft
    TextureFirm and Supple
    RindWaxed
    ColourPale Yellow
    FlavourFruity, Nutty, Sweet, Tangy
    AromaGrassy, Pleasant
    VegetarianNo
  • Caerphilly
  • Caerphilly

    British - Fruity - Silky - Spicy

  • Organic
  • Organic

    English - Creamy - Rich - Full-Flavour

  • Gruyère
  • Gruyere

    Cheese

  • Parmesan
  • Parmesan

    Parmesan

    Caerphilly

    Tornegus is made from Caerphilly cheese washed in wine and marinated in mint and verbena until it turns creamy, semi soft and absolutely delicious.

    Fruity, silky and spicy, it’s a pungent cheese with a definite echo of the farmyard. It has an orange sticky rind speckled with herbs.

    Tornegus was created by James Aldridge, one of the leaders of the revival of British artisan cheeses in the 1980s and 1990s.

    What with? Tornegus goes particularly well with a glass of Port or a lively red (like a Rioja) or even a cider.

    Cheese Board Chutney made of apples, raisins and walnuts is ideal with this cheese

    Made fromCow's Milk
    RegionEngland
    VegetarianYes

    Organic

    Our best selling 14-month old, organic Godminster Cheese is made with pasteurised cows milk straight from the Somerset farms’ own dairy cows.

    This vintage cheese is handmade in Somerset from a 70 year old recipe, using traditional methods, and comes wrapped in its distinctive burgundy wax. The cheese is thoroughly organic and suitable for Vegetarians.

    Godminster Cheddar is a firm pressed medium to strong cheese. Most noticeable is the cheese’s exceptionally creamy, rich, full flavour. Initially mellow with a creamy consistency, Godminster then progresses to a tasty, lingering after bite.

    As Godminster is wholly organic, using no preservatives at all, it is highly recommended that the cheese is kept refrigerated at all times.

    Its creamy consistency is best kept if left in the wax, allowing the cheese to be either scooped or sliced.

    In order to bring out the flavour fully, we also suggest that Godminster be removed from the fridge approximately one hour before serving, to allow it to warm to room temperature before consumption.

    Amazing coupled with a good apple chutney.

    Made fromPasteurized Cow's Milk
    RegionSomerset
    TypeSemi-soft, Blue-veined
    TextureCreamy & Smooth
    RindNatural
    VegetarianYes

    Gruyere

    Gruyere

    Parmesan

    Parmesan